http://www.lemac.com.au/site/DefaultSite/filesystem/images/transcend/transcend8gbcfcard.jpg Fast, reliable, and high-capacity. With consistent performance and vast storage capacity, Transcend’s 133x CF cards are the perfect match for Zaxcom Audio recording as well as photographic stills capture. Not recommended for video due to lower write speed.

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Transcend 8GB CF Card (65MB/s)

Transcend

Fast, reliable, and high-capacity. With consistent performance and vast storage capacity, Transcend’s 133x CF cards are the perfect match for Zaxcom Audio recording as well as photographic stills capture. Not recommended for video due to lower write speed.
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  • Price:
    $30.00
    inc. GST

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Fast, reliable, and high-capacity. With consistent performance and vast storage capacity, Transcend’s 133x CF cards are the perfect match for Zaxcom Audio recording and photographic stills capture. Not recommended for video.

Media Recommendations for Zaxcom Audio

Zaxcom recommends SanDisk and Transcend compact flash cards. Don’t use cards with “double write speed” features. Any modern card, 16 GB to 32 GB card (such as the 133x), should be fine. Do not use cards from questionable manufacturers, as they will wear out quickly due to the lack of a good wear levelling algorithm.

If you are planning to record at 96 kHz, choose a card that claims 10 MB per second SUSTAINED write speed (MAX write speed does NOT count). Once you have the cards in hand, considering testing their ability to keep up with the recording process:

  • For Sampling-rates lower than 96 kHz – record all tracks for 10 minutes with pre-record set to 10 seconds (not available at 88 kHz and 96 kHz) at a higher sampling-rate than you expect to use, with all the effects you intend to use, enabled.
  • For Sampling-rate equal to 96 kHz – record 1 more track than you expect to use for 10, with all the effects you intend to use, enabled.
  • If the unit kicks out of record, the card could not keep up.
  • Wait a few seconds for the pre-record buffer to fill. Press Record and watch the Time Left on Disk field. It should count faster than real time for a while as the pre-record buffer catches up. The faster it catches up, the better. This will not work for 88 kHz and 96 kHz as pre-record is not available.